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jcat (jcat)
Junior Member
Username: jcat

Post Number: 730
Registered: 10-2007
Posted on Tuesday, October 23, 2018 - 08:34 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Have a horse with thin soles that I've tried for 2 years to keep barefoot, who's had enough setbacks that shoes are most likely needed. Having always been a barefoot enthusiast,I now need someone experienced with both barefoot and corrective shoeing. Had one farrier who recently stood me up. Communication and working with me as an owner is key. Looking for input/recommendations/insight and help with some general understanding of the good, bad and ugly. I'm in southern NH, and never really "had" to shoe before. Prefer a gentle manner and calm handling style, Vs throwing tires on the vehicle, if you will. Have found someone new I'm trying, but, it's like entering a whole new world. Looking to hear what others like, dislike, expect, don't expect etc. It's like changing religions.
Emily Phillips (dusty318)
New member
Username: dusty318

Post Number: 2
Registered: 04-2017
Posted on Tuesday, October 23, 2018 - 11:21 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It isn't like changing religions at all. It's about what needs to be done to provide for your horse. I'm a little off put by your attitude and if you addressed the farrier in the same tone as this post it may explain why you were stood up. Most people, farriers included, will be as communicative as possible, especially if they are small business owners and word of mouth is their reputation.
bill gokey (bronco_billy)
Junior Member
Username: bronco_billy

Post Number: 6385
Registered: 07-2008
Posted on Tuesday, October 23, 2018 - 12:39 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Most farriers I know don't just slap a pair of shoes on without considerable thought as to why the horse might need them.
I have one horse that needs shoes because of sore feet (thin soles). You may find out that a pair of shoes will help heal the underlying problem by giving the bruising a rest, then you can experiment with barefoot again.
I haven't seen a horse yet that wouldn't travel better, in all conditions, with shoes on.
I'll shoeing a few with borium and pads for the upcoming winter even if they're sound, which they are.
bill gokey (bronco_billy)
Junior Member
Username: bronco_billy

Post Number: 6386
Registered: 07-2008
Posted on Tuesday, October 23, 2018 - 02:58 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

shoe. while I'm at it. I remember when the Mass. Horse Search and Rescue first started. My friend was one of the first to start a chapter in W. Mass. I was already on call 24/7 with the power company however I did attend a few meetings. This was back in the early 90's I think.
The state police laid out many of the rules that had to be followed. One was, all horses needed shoes. Of course there were arguments for barefoot. The S.P. reasoning was that nobody really knew where the next search would be. It could be along the ocean on a nice sandy beach or in the mountains on nothing but rocks. When they needed help, they didn't want to wait.
With the advent to newer type of hoof boots, maybe that rule doesn't stand?
jcluvhrses (jcluvhrses)
Junior Member
Username: jcluvhrses

Post Number: 13424
Registered: N/A
Posted on Tuesday, October 23, 2018 - 04:57 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My question would be what is the cause of the thin soles? There is always a reason and ensuring a proper trim is often where it starts.
Have you ruled out using hoof boots?
For farriers, there is Issac Camacho who use to be in Haverhill.
Everything is a choice.
sarad (sarad)
Junior Member
Username: sarad

Post Number: 1606
Registered: 10-2007
Posted on Tuesday, October 23, 2018 - 05:10 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I can recommend Shirley Fraser out of Pepperell. Don't know if her service area includes NH but she's right on the border.
Beantown Massachusetts
bill gokey (bronco_billy)
Junior Member
Username: bronco_billy

Post Number: 6387
Registered: 07-2008
Posted on Tuesday, October 23, 2018 - 06:26 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Genetics can be the problem. Diet, hoof trimming, abscesses, stone bruises from errant rocks. Sometimes it takes awhile to figure it out.

Letting the walls grow down a bit will take pressure off the sole like a shoe will, depending on the hoof. Cutting and rolling the walls below the level of the sole will contribute to sole bruising. I'm talking a flat, thinned soled hoof, not a really well developed hoof.
Look up genetics and thin soles.
sabrina (sabrinatmc)
Junior Member
Username: sabrinatmc

Post Number: 3738
Registered: 10-2007
Posted on Tuesday, October 23, 2018 - 08:54 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I would put your horse on Bioton. that will help the hoof to grow more. I remember reading a product years ago that you can apply to the sole to help harden it up. I just don't remember where I found the info. but from what I read it sounded like a good product. it was like a regular hoof dressing but once on. it got hard. I'll have try to research it again.
aharlov (aharlov)
Junior Member
Username: aharlov

Post Number: 749
Registered: 03-2014
Posted on Tuesday, October 23, 2018 - 09:16 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Jcat, where are you located? I'm on the North Shore and have experience with barefoot rehab trimming, boot fitting, casting, as well as glue on shoes. I don't do nails or metal, though. (Personal preference, not looking to start a debate)
I spent some time in England in 2015 at Rockley Farm hoof rehab learning about various factors that contribute to soreness and thin soles and how to rehab them.

Thin soles definitely need protection, but ultimately they need to be rehabbed to thicker soles and healthier feet.

If you want to email me I'd be happy to share with you some things to try for your horse (mineral balancing/small diet tweaks, etc). If you like the new person you're working with I would stick with them.
bill gokey (bronco_billy)
Junior Member
Username: bronco_billy

Post Number: 6388
Registered: 07-2008
Posted on Tuesday, October 23, 2018 - 09:27 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I posted this video before.
This us the horse with flat feet snd thin soles. I bought her at auction 12 years ago. After some research I found that the reason she was in the auction is because of her feet, Her brother had the same problem.
Not a problem really, just have to work around it. When she gets sore barefoot I put shoes on, fronts only. After a couple of months I pull them and she how she is without them. gravel is the testing surface. I leave them off until we see signs of the ouchys. If and when that happens, the shoes go back on.
You'll notice after I pull the shoes and trim her I don't touch the soles with my knife. As a matter of fact I hardly use a knife on any of the horses except to trim the bars and frog.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XR8Olexyd1A&t=129s
aharlov (aharlov)
Junior Member
Username: aharlov

Post Number: 750
Registered: 03-2014
Posted on Wednesday, October 24, 2018 - 12:11 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sabrina, are you thinking of Hoof Armor? I've used that and like it.
sabrina (sabrinatmc)
Junior Member
Username: sabrinatmc

Post Number: 3739
Registered: 10-2007
Posted on Wednesday, October 24, 2018 - 02:34 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

yes it was the hoof armor. I came across one more that might help is keratex. but I did some reseach on it. and it showed better results over time.

thanks Aharlov
sabrina (sabrinatmc)
Junior Member
Username: sabrinatmc

Post Number: 3740
Registered: 10-2007
Posted on Wednesday, October 24, 2018 - 02:36 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

sorry it was the hoof armor that had better results. sorry I'm just not awake today.
bill gokey (bronco_billy)
Junior Member
Username: bronco_billy

Post Number: 6390
Registered: 07-2008
Posted on Thursday, October 25, 2018 - 04:22 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Donkey trim.. Don't wait too long. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c6hxgBZMssw
pezk (pezk)
Junior Member
Username: pezk

Post Number: 731
Registered: 06-2009
Posted on Thursday, October 25, 2018 - 07:26 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Durasole also works to harden soles and helps with thrush etc. itss the purple stuff in a bottle.
aharlov (aharlov)
Junior Member
Username: aharlov

Post Number: 751
Registered: 03-2014
Posted on Thursday, October 25, 2018 - 11:41 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I usually don't like Durasole because it "hardens" by drying out the foot and making the sole more brittle, instead of helping to build healthier live sole. Hoof Armor is a Kevlar based epoxy that covers the sole (or wherever you put it) so doesn't change or hurt the sole itself other than allowing it to build more sole by preventing wear. It does give some protection too.
tbtrakh (tbaby)
Junior Member
Username: tbaby

Post Number: 3652
Registered: 02-2009
Posted on Wednesday, November 07, 2018 - 02:59 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I didn't see anything wrong with the ops tone of the post. They were just looking for recommendations on something that's new to them.
Over the past twenty five years of owning several horses in different places, I've learned many different farriers are highly recommended for very different reasons.

Not every single one is the perfect fit for each horse. Many don't always show up when they say they will but do show up within the week or day or in an emergency.

Some don't tolerate what they see as dangerous behaviors from a horse and are old school with yelling or getting after them, which doesn't work with nervous horses or older horses with old injuries that can't handle legs being lifted a certain way or standing on one leg too long. Same for horses with sight issues that can't cross tie or spook at strange objects, I've had two horses with sight problems now.
Many highly recommended expert farriers could not get my mare to keep her shoes on for more than two or three weeks at a time. Then got offended that her feet stumped them. She's been on every biotin hoof suppliment possible.
It's reasonable to want someone to show up or call/text to reschedule and work with you as the owner who knows the horse best and handle your horse as you wish to accommodate age, injuries, personality and level of training. However many big name farriers I've seen over the years don't necessarily do that and act like people should be grateful to just pay high prices to them no questions asked.
Unfortunately just what I've seen in various barns in various areas over the decades. Not even just my horses but many places I've boarded.
Burt and Harry (burtandharry)
New member
Username: burtandharry

Post Number: 76
Registered: 03-2014
Posted on Wednesday, November 07, 2018 - 08:48 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

OP don't be afraid of shoes. The best thing is what is best for your horse. Shoes are not bad if your horse needs shoes. It is all about keeping your horse comfortable. I would question Bills assertion that all horse benefit from shoes or go better in them. I have a horse that I was told buy 2 different farriers in 2 different states would never need shoes unless I decide to do endurance riding on pavement. I know some standardbred who are raced barefoot and are sound. It all depends on the horse, the work load and the hoof.

The key is to have your horse well mannered for the farrier. It also might be worth talking to your vet for a recommendation. Your vet probably works with all the farriers in the area and might have some insight on who you would work well with. I think if you are putting shoes on for a specific lameness based reason it is worth it to get lateral radiographs of the feet. This allows the farrier to know where the bones are and the angles they are at. It gives the farrier a guideline particularly on a horse that hasn't ever had shoes on. It may be nice for the farrier to know going into a shoeing if the horse is going to need a wedge shoe or an equithane padding.
tbtrakh (tbaby)
Junior Member
Username: tbaby

Post Number: 3653
Registered: 02-2009
Posted on Thursday, November 08, 2018 - 12:02 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Horses can have overall good manners and training and be safe for general handling but still be very old or very young or have injuries or quirks that require some accommodation.
My ancient mare had a major suspensory injury ligament tear on a hind leg many years ago, she reinjured it while healing and it basically ended our serious eventing days. She also had a suspensory ligament injury tear on the opposite front leg prior which would naturally be the leg she would compensate the most on it.
She can't stand for extensive amounts of time only on that hind leg, it simply gives out after a while, just like my bad knee. And if a vet or farrier pick up that leg she needs freedom to stretch it her own cerain way first. And if anyone twists it in a weird angle she instantly pulls away violently, not to kick but to escape the pain it must cause. For my knee that I've dislocated at least ten or more times in the past two or more decades, if anyone starts maneuvering or twisting that knee or leg I do the same as my mare and free my leg instantly.
She's not vicious, untrained or hard to handle, she's just got a lot of arthritis and scar tissue.
It's reasonable to want a farrier to respect issues like that if they're told about them.
bill gokey (bronco_billy)
Junior Member
Username: bronco_billy

Post Number: 6421
Registered: 07-2008
Posted on Monday, November 12, 2018 - 06:55 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Burt and Harry. All the horses at my farm are barefoot except for one. 100 percent of the riding is on trails of various footing. The only surface where I see any ouchies... marble sized stones on hard packed gravel roads.
It depends on the surface. A track would be no problem, trails no problem. Most trails are fairly soft, rocks are larger so the stones don't penetrate like gravel on hard pack. My arena is also no problem.
I could however put shoes on all horses and they would travel in comfort on all surfaces, including gravel. I said all horses when I should have said our horses under our riding conditions. Mass Search and Rescue required shoes, back then for a reason, not sure about now with all the new boots on the market. I have a barn full of different boots, mainly for one horse. She however has no problems, at all with shoes on, she happy.
I will put borium shoes with rim pads on several of the horses shortly. We ride year round and gravel roads in our area can be icy.

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