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jezabel65 (jezabel65)
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Username: jezabel65

Post Number: 32
Registered: 05-2014
Posted on Friday, September 15, 2017 - 11:51 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am moving my horse to the Blue Hills in Milton which are notoriously rocky. Where I ride is rocky but I am told Blue Hills is much rockier. Plus you have to go down a short street to get to trails. My horse has always been barefoot and never had boots for riding. I have never had an issue with her feet, no bruising or abcesses. All the horses at the new barn are shod except for one older one who has boots. They are telling me she will need shoes to be comfortable. If I get boots, does she need them for all 4 hooves? My concern is she has an old scar that wraps right around her coronet band on her back foot. Will boots rub on this scar? Opinions on her being able to stay barefoot and comfortable? Is there any one out there that has stayed barefoot, boot-free and rides rocky trails? Opinions on whether I should just put shoes on her? Help please!
Jeff Livingstone (hippotekhni)
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Username: hippotekhni

Post Number: 77
Registered: 04-2014
Posted on Friday, September 15, 2017 - 12:15 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

On the draft cross I ride on rocky trails 3x a week I've been using EasyBoot Trail (the newer 2015 edition) on all four feet. They are terrific if you keep them washed out after every ride. They protect her bare feet very well. Their lining is made of neoprene which can sit against the back of the hoof without rubbing. However it's important to get the right size. I had to return a couple of sizes and work with my farrier to finally get the best fitting size. Luckily, the Easyboot people were fantastic to work with.
Home of "Enlightened Horsemanship"
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tbtrakh (tbaby)
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Username: tbaby

Post Number: 3124
Registered: 02-2009
Posted on Friday, September 15, 2017 - 12:46 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If she has an old scar that low boots may rub. It may depend on how sensitive her skin is to rubs in general. Does she tend to get rubs from saddles, tack, blankets, bell boots? Boots aren't cheap although I think most are returnable within a certain time frame and limited uae.

After my nightmare experience of moving my horses to a very rocky place and having both get abscesses within less than 2 weeks just from turnout in the rocky paddock, I'd say just put shoes on, with pads!!!
My younger horse has been sound barefoot his whole life and never had any hoof issues, and he's evented. Never had an abscess through all kinds of work and turnout and he runs in turnout. Never lame and he's 12 now. Within a week there he was dead lame from an abscess. Same day my poor mare (his mother) had a huge abscess and was so lame she was lying down and refusing to eat or get up I thought she was dying. A week later she had another abscess on the other front foot. She hasn't had an abscess in over 10 years and this was just from turnout, no riding or work whatsoever for either of them.
Since June and well over $3000 just in vet bills, the poor mare just got special glue on shoes and surgical plates on her front feet yesterday and seems to be feeling no pain. She was supposed to have surgery on one foot since the infection went so deep but luckily she decided to heal on her own. 4 months of soaking, treating, flushing and rewrapping every day or every other day. Countless hours of worry and stress with two, then one sick horse. The mare had front shoes yet still got abscesses on both front feet. Just from very rocky turnout. And I spent hours every day literally picking up every rock and removing it from their paddock.
Moved out of that awful rock infested nightmare, best decision ever. Both horses are happy and much healthier now.
If you must move to a very rocky place, I'd go with shoes. Horses aren't mountain goats. Literally the saying no hoof no horse is very true.
jcluvhrses (jcluvhrses)
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Username: jcluvhrses

Post Number: 12802
Registered: N/A
Posted on Friday, September 15, 2017 - 04:32 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You won't know until you try. Some horses have tough feet and can handle it. You could try boots on the fronts only and see how it works. There are boots with a lower profile that won't rub on the hairline.
If your horse has good concavity and thick soles you may be okay. If your horse is more flat footed you will most likely need protection via a boot or shoe.
You know your horse best so you will feel if she's uncomfortable on the trails. And if it's that rocky you'll be travelling at a slow pace.
Everything is a choice.
bill gokey (bronco_billy)
Junior Member
Username: bronco_billy

Post Number: 6019
Registered: 07-2008
Posted on Friday, September 15, 2017 - 05:09 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I agree on the rocks tbaby, especially if your horse hasn't been on them, shoes or no shoes. There's lots of barefoot space between the rims. A stone bruise is a potential abscess.
When I first started shoeing and trimming, I watched very closely to the trims and shoeing. Back then I was having them done every 8 weeks or so, except for one. I did notice the farriers trimming the sole so it gave to thumb pressure and that's when they stopped sole trimming. The heels were brought back, frogs trimmed and break over seemed ok.
I had a few horses that ended up with abscesses. The rocks and the thin soles were the culprit. If the thumb can make the sole give, imagine what a sharp rock can do, shoes or no shoes. Pads would help until the sole grew back but then lay off the sole thinning, just chalk and little touchups.
I think my farriers were trying to save me money because of the number of horses I had, I was still working and doing horses also ( but I even use to barter now and then). I did appreciate this but I think that's when i decided to do trims and shoe myself, on my schedule. Not knocking my farriers, they were great! I do think farriers did it this way many years ago.
jcluvhrses (jcluvhrses)
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Username: jcluvhrses

Post Number: 12803
Registered: N/A
Posted on Friday, September 15, 2017 - 09:34 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Trimming till the sole gave with thumb pressure? Ugh!
Everything is a choice.
bill gokey (bronco_billy)
Junior Member
Username: bronco_billy

Post Number: 6020
Registered: 07-2008
Posted on Friday, September 15, 2017 - 11:43 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes, There is a difference in thumb pressures, yours might not be as strong as a 250lb farrier.
bill gokey (bronco_billy)
Junior Member
Username: bronco_billy

Post Number: 6022
Registered: 07-2008
Posted on Sunday, September 17, 2017 - 09:08 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Depends. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85AWy_HDnzU

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